FANGS! Snakes In The Hood

Editor’s note: Capt. William E. Simpson told me that the CDC and many state poison control centers are being swamped with calls about snakebites. Since this could be of concern to each of us, he submitted the following article as a public service.

Capt. Bill is the author of The Nautical Prepper and Dark Stallions – Legend of the Centaurians, and has been my guest on DestinySurvival Radio. He occasionally contributes articles here for DestinySurvival. – John

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Fangs!

Author Capt. William E. Simpson displays the fangs of a Pacific Rattlesnake; its deadly venom is seen dripping off the wire.

 

Looks like it’s shaping-up to be a particularly bad year for rattlesnakes and snakebites here in the Pacific Northwest and across America as many news stories are now reporting; here’s one:
http://www.wyff4.com/article/dramatic-increase-in-snake-bites-reported-know-which-snakes-are-most-dangerous/9593029

In fact, we killed 7 rattlesnakes so far just in May around the homestead (here in Siskiyou County, CA) and seen one I let live (seen in the photos in my ‘Mr. Grumpy’ article: read here: http://www.myoutdoorbuddy.com/articles/67877281/mr.-grumpy-rears-his-ugly-head–again.php).

When these pit-vipers (rattlers) are operating in close proximity to people, homes, pets (horses & livestock) accidents can and do happen. In these cases where a venomous snake presents an unacceptable ‘danger-close’ risk, I prefer to eliminate the risk by killing the viper.

Here’s two rattlers (photos below) that my wife Laura killed just 15-minutes apart in her bird garden yesterday (Friday May 26th). She was wearing flip-flops when she noticed the first one that appeared a few feet behind her. So after killing it using a few rocks, she got her boots on and when she returned to finish filling the bird feeders (15-min.) there was another one waiting.

 

Twin Rattlesnakes

Of course, my buddy Mr. Gnome (in photo above) isn’t impressed, he sees-em all the time… he lets anyone into his garden parties.

 

Then, a little later the same day, Jack our trusty McNab dog started a warning bark; he had found another rattler in the driveway… this one was even bigger… maybe 4.5 feet.

And the season has just begun! Families who are planning on spending vacation time at the lakes, rivers and streams (places with water) should maintain an extra careful lookout over children and pets. Like most other snakes, rattlesnakes absorb most of the water they need from their prey. It’s usually their prey that requires the water. However, venomous snakes maintain habitats in the mountains, forests and in driest areas as well, such as the deserts of Eastern Oregon, Nevada, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico and yes, Southern California.

 

Snake Venom

When I pulled the fangs forward, venom begins to flow.

 

Large Rattler

 

A large male rattler (photo above) is seen hiding in my wife’s rock garden near the bird feeders/water. This well-camouflaged snake remained unseen by my wife even when I pointed to it. The heat sensing pits on the snakes nose are easily seen (black colored pits)… and allow the snake to strike and hit warm blooded animals with deadly accuracy.

Depending on variables of temp and humidity, Rattlesnakes are most active during the hot days of summer early in the day from around 7:00-11:00 AM and then again early evening from around 4:00PM through sundown and early evening. They spend a lot of time around areas that attract rodents (chicken coops, bird baths and feeders, barns, areas of litter and garbage, etc. Because rodents do require water, and the snakes know this instinctively, places where there is water and food suitable for rodents are prime real estate, and snakes like to lay waiting in nearby shady places in ambush.

The Pacific Rattler is fortunately not as deadly as many other poisonous snakes in America. South and southeastern CA, Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Colorado, Nevada have numerous species of rattlesnakes, including some areas there, which have been known to host the Mojave-Green Rattler, whose venom contains both a hemotoxin and a neurotoxin… a devastating combination!

The Pacific Rattler’s hemotoxin poses an additional threat to folks who are taking blood thinners, and therefore, requires special attention. Attending EMS personnel and doctor(s) should be made aware of any drugs that have been taken during the intake process for snakebite.

As many folks know, I grew-up in the Applegate Valley of Southern Oregon where we had our fair share of Pacific Rattlesnakes. And I have collected and studied snakes as a hobby for decades, so I have extensive experience handling and dealing with them, meaning; don’t mess around with any snake unless you have the knowledge and experience! Handling any venomous snake, even when it is dead is extremely dangerous and should never be done except by expert handlers.

Folks with questions, feel free to contact me via my email contact form.

Snakes are mostly beneficial, so unless you have a rattler near pets, livestock or the house, don’t kill them; they eat mice and rats, which do a lot of property damage and spread disease.

It’s interesting to note that many snakebites are instigated by inexperienced people attempting to kill a snake.

 

Capt. Bill with Bullsnake

Capt. Bill with a beneficial gopher snake.

 

Capt. Bill with Dispatched Rattlesnake

A 5’4″ viper (Pacific Rattlesnake) above; one of the largest Bill has dispatched in Nor. CA/OR…

 

Snake's Buttons

It had 12 buttons… second most, behind a larger Rattlesnake that had 18.

 

Have a safe and fun Summer!

 

Capt. William E. Simpson II – USMM Ret.
More about the author here.

 

Author: DestinySurvival Contributor

DestinySurvival contributors have met at least one of the following conditions: The author... 1) Has had content published previously on this site. 2) Has been a guest on DestinySurvival Radio. 3) Is a representative of one of this site's affiliate companies or paid advertisers. Exceptions are occasionally made after careful screening.

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