FiberFix – A Review

A representative contacted me from the FiberFix company to see if I’d be interested in reviewing their product. I agreed to accept a sample and do a review because I think FiberFix has a number of uses which will prove useful to preppers.

FiberFix is repair wrap that is said to be 100 times stronger than duct tape. It’s useful if you’re in need of a quick, strong fix.

It was featured on the “Shark Tank” TV show and is apparently growing in popularity.

 

Suitcase Handle Repaired with FiberFix

 

This past weekend my wife’s cousin helped me wrap a broken suitcase handle. He read the instructions, and I applied the FiberFix.

The concept of a FiberFix repair is easy, but doing the job was a little trickier than I expected. Several extra steps are necessary in comparison to using duct tape. And it doesn’t help that I’m not that great at handyman tasks, even little ones.

I received the hard sided suitcase as a gift back in the 1970’s. Somehow the handle broke in two after years of use, and we wrapped it with duct tape. It held that way for many years, but eventually the tape gave way.

The first order of business for the repair was to cut and tear off the old duct tape. I used rubbing alcohol to remove as much of the sticky tape glue from the handle as I could. I didn’t get it all off, but I did what I could.

In keeping with the FiberFix instructions, I used the sandpaper, which got a little more crud off the handle. In this instance, it may not have been necessary to do this because the handle had a rough texture, and it was still somewhat sticky.

Normally the coarse sandpaper should be used to roughen up a smooth surface so the FiberFix tape can adhere better.

I put on a set of plastic gloves that came with the package. They’re small, and I wasn’t sure they’d fit. But they stretched and were adequate.

The gloves are meant to protect your hands from the resin in the FiberFix tape. Including them is a good idea, but one size may not fit all.

I took the FiberFix roll out of its wrapping and dunked it into water in the kitchen sink for several seconds. I wrung as much water out of it as I could.

Next came the task of rolling the thick tape around the suitcase handle.

As you can see from the picture above, the repair job is bulky. It’s possible I didn’t wrap the tape as tight as I could have. There was a lot of tape for the task at hand.

My wife said she would have cut off only the amount that seemed necessary, if she had been there to do the repair. But the directions say to use the whole roll. So that’s what I did.

Having a premeasured amount of tape seems to me to be a distinct disadvantage. I don’t see how any unused tape could be reused. It would be better to have a good sized roll that would allow you to measure out the amount you need before getting it wet and wrapping it around the object being repaired.

I realize that, as with any kind of tape, multiple layers adds strength. But if you wanted to repair a crack running lengthwise along a pipe or wooden chair leg, you might need more tape than what you’re allowed in the FiberFix package.

That said, there are different sizes of FiberFix. But you’ll need to determine what length and width you need for the job you have in mind.

 

Boxes of FiberFix Repair Wrap

 

Next in my repair of the suitcase handle came the application of an outer plastic wrap, which is supposed to be wrapped tightly around the FiberFix tape for a few minutes to help the tape to seal better.

My wife’s cousin misread the directions, so I kept the outer wrap on for less than a minute, rather than the ten minutes specified. I’m wondering if this also contributed to the bulkiness of the repair.

I put my hand on the FiberFix shortly after taking off the outer wrap, and the tape felt warm. I assume that indicated a chemical reaction as the tape hardened. And it does get hard. There’s no flexibility when it’s set.

One corner edge of the wrap I’d done was jagged, so I cut it off with a pocketknife. That didn’t help much, so I’ll have to sand it down a bit. This showed me it’s possible to cut through FiberFix, but I’m guessing it would be difficult to cut through more than one layer of it.

FiberFix is rough to the touch, which wouldn’t be a problem if you’re repairing a pipe, which you fix and forget. But it’s noticeable on the suitcase handle, since a person’s hand comes into direct contact with the handle repair job any time the suitcase is lifted.

The same could apply if you fix a tool handle at the point where your hand needs to touch it to use the tool.

My repair job may not be pretty or perfect, but I don’t think the handle will ever come apart again.

Here are a couple photos of examples of FiberFix offerings.

 

2-inch Single Roll FiberFix

2 Rolls Repair Wrap FiberFix

 

Incidentally, FiberFix isn’t meant to be used as a patch. It works when you wrap it around something.

FiberFix is said to be available in 30,000 retail outlets. If you can’t find it, or if you need more info go to www.FiberFix.com.

Click here to view a brochure on uses for FiberFix.

Below are two YouTube videos that tell you a little more. The second video is a demonstration of how to use it to repair PVC pipe.

If you don’t mind that FiberFix is messier and more tedious to use than duct tape, give it a try. When you need a good, strong bond to hold what you’re repairing, FiberFix will do the job.

 

 

 

Author: John Wesley Smith

John Wesley Smith writes and podcasts from his home in Central Missouri. His goal is to help preppers as he continues along his own preparedness journey.