Could Your Survival Garden Make You Sick?

“Backwoods Home Magazine” for March/April 2016 (Issue #158) includes an article on how you can keep your survival garden from making you sick.

Maybe you’ve never had a problem. You’ve been gardening for years, even decades, and nobody in your family has ever caught a foodborne illness from what you’ve grown or canned.

Besides, that stuff only happens with large farming operations who sell to grocery stores and chain restaurants. Right?

But before you think such a thing couldn’t happen, consider the topics the article covers. Pay attention especially if you grow for a local farmers market.

  • Sources of contamination
  • Good agricultural practices
  • Manure
  • Compost
  • Go vertical and mulch
  • Wildlife
  • Water
  • Harvesting
  • Storage and transport
  • Keep good records

Check out the following exerpt, then read the complete article by clicking on the llink below.

Prevent foodborne illness with safe gardening methods

By Donna Insco

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website, “CDC estimates that each year roughly 1 in 6 Americans (or 48 million people) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die of foodborne diseases.” According to the CDC, produce was implicated in nearly half of the reported cases from 1998 to 2008.

The reports are troubling. In 2006, a multi-state Escherichia coli (E. coli) outbreak in spinach sickened more than 200 people and led to the deaths of at least three. Celery was implicated in a Listeria outbreak in 2010. In 2011, 147 people in 28 states contracted Listeria from whole cantaloupes from Colorado.


Read the whole article here:
http://www.backwoodshome.com/prevent-foodborne-illness-with-safe-gardening-methods-by-donna-insco/

Excerpt used with permission of Backwoods Home Magazine.
http://www.backwoodshome.com (541)247-8900.

When you’re looking for gardening seeds and supplies, check out the Survival Gardening page in the Prep Mart.

Author: John Wesley Smith

John Wesley Smith writes and podcasts from his home in Central Missouri. His goal is to help preppers as he continues along his own preparedness journey.