Is Woodstove Cooking Part of Your Survival Kitchen Routine Yet?

When I smell wood smoke from someone’s house in the country, I think of my great grandmother. She’s been gone for 17 years, but lived to be almost 97. Until the last few years of her life, she cooked her meals with a woodstove.

Her old two story house was run down and too small for the large family reunions we had there. But at Christmas, when you came into Great Grandma’s crowded kitchen, the woodstove radiated its welcoming heat. And you knew good food was soon to follow.

Woodstoves are becoming more popular as more of us are cutting back and simplifying our lifestyles. They may become necessary for survival as fuel prices rise or if fuel and electricity become rare commodities.

If you have a woodstove, but haven’t been using it for cooking, take a look at this article excerpt from the January/February 2011 “Backwoods Home Magazine.”


Woodstove cooking

By Cindi Myers

If you have a woodstove for heat, take advantage of the fire to cook your dinner for no extra cost and very little effort. The heat of a woodstove can cook yummy baked potatoes and apples, savory soups and stews, roast chicken or beef, and many other dishes.

Though you can adapt almost any pots and pans to woodstove cooking, you’ll save yourself trouble and ensure better results if you invest in a cast iron Dutch oven with a lid and a cast iron trivet. The Dutch oven heats evenly and stays hot for a long time, which is perfect for roasting meat or stewing moist dishes. The trivet allows you to regulate the amount of heat the Dutch oven receives. Aluminum foil, a wooden spoon, a set of tongs, a fireplace shovel, and some potholders will round out your woodstove cooking supplies.

Read the whole article here:

Excerpt used with permission of Backwoods Home Magazine. 1-800-835-2418


Author: John Wesley Smith

John Wesley Smith writes and podcasts from his home in Central Missouri. His goal is to help preppers as he continues along his own preparedness journey.