Survival Kitchen–Super Easy Bread Making

If you’ve been prepping very long, you’ve noticed there’s considerable interest in making homemade bread. Perhaps you’ve wanted to make it yourself. Now there’s a pathway to super easy bread making.

Who doesn’t love homemade bread? It can be a lot of work though, which is a disincentive to making it.

The book that changes all that is The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, by Jeff Hertzberg MD and Zoe Francois. This is a fully revised and updated edition of their first book on artisan bread making. They promise there’s no kneading, no starter, no proofing yeast and no need for a bread machine.

It sounds too good to be true, doesn’t it? It’s based on the concept of mixed and risen high-moisture dough stored in the fridge for up to two weeks. The dough is cut into pieces and put in the oven for fresh bread whenever you’re ready. You really can have fresh homemade bread every day.

You’ll find recipes in this book for several different kinds of bread, pizza crust, rolls, and more. This revised edition also includes more than thirty brand-new recipes for Beer-Cheese Bread, Crock-Pot Bread, Panini, Pretzel Buns, and Apple-Stuffed French Toast, to name a few. In The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Daythey’ve made the “Tips and Techniques” and “Ingredients” chapters bigger and better. They’ve also included readers’ Frequently Asked Questions.

I admit that I don’t know whether the kind of flour you use makes any difference for these recipes. In other words, would the flour you grind yourself work with this? I’d be glad to hear from anyone who tries it.

Remember that keeping the dough is dependent on keeping it cool, which generally requires electricity. If you’re completely without electricity for an extended period of time, this will be a problem. If you live off the grid or have a means of refrigeration you use on camping or boating trips, give it a try.

Baking homemade breads regularly will be a healthful way to wean your family off bread from the store shelves. Consider this preparation for the day when getting bread from the store isn’t possible and you must rely on the grains and grain mill you’ve set aside.

To get The New Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day, click on its title wherever you see it linked in this post. That takes you to the page featuring the book, where you can place your order.

I think it’s fantastic that the authors of this book have made baking bread so easy and rewarding. It’s an idea whose time has come.

 

Author: John Wesley Smith

John Wesley Smith writes and podcasts from his home in Central Missouri. His goal is to help preppers as he continues along his own preparedness journey.

4 thoughts on “Survival Kitchen–Super Easy Bread Making”

  1. I’ve been using this method since I found out about it. It works really well! I also have used my own ground hard red wheat for a loaf, and it was dense and chewy, but still quite tasty. I also ground some pearled barley I had around for the barley flatbread in the book, and that was good too. The basic recipe makes the best pizza crust I’ve EVER had (we actually had grilled pizza for dinner tonight from that recipe), and it also makes good naan, as well as boules. I LOVE it!

  2. Thanks. That’s great news and very encouraging. I’m glad you let everyone know about your experience.

    John

  3. OK, here it is, quoted directly from their site at
    http://www.artisanbreadinfive.com/?p=195

    “The correct version of our basic recipe in the book (page 26) is:
    3 cups lukewarm water
    1 1/2 tablespoons granulated yeast
    1 1/2 tablespoons kosher or other coarse salt
    6 1/2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    Cornmeal for the pizza peel
    And then, you know the drill. Mix with a spoon in a food-safe bucket, let it rise at room temperature for 2 to 5 hours, then into the fridge for two weeks. Tear off
    chunks, shape, rest, and bake as needed. And you all know you can decrease the yeast and the salt if you like it. Details in the book. But there it is, pretty much.”

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