Set Goals for Survival

            Goal setting is a favorite topic of motivational speakers.  You may think that, because you’re not a salesman of some kind, you don’t need to be concerned with setting goals.  Goal setting for survival is important, but it doesn’t have to be an overwhelming affair.  As with anything, as the old saying goes, if you aim at nothing, you’ll surely hit it.

 

            The fast moving changes in the economy in recent months have caused many to be disoriented and anxious.  You don’t have to be among that number.  Set small attainable goals for each day, week, and month.  Write them on a list or calendar.  Do it in some way that reminds you of your goals.  Don’t get discouraged if you don’t meet each goal.  Not everything you attempt to grow in your garden will be a success, but that doesn’t mean your garden is a failure.  So it is with attaining your goals.

 

            As a daily goal, you might simply say you’re going to exercise a bit or eat more healthful foods.  Get car tires checked, oil changed, etc.  Clean up an area to free it up for storage food or other survival supplies.  Keep your tasks manageable.  When you’re finished with that day’s goals, write down one for the next day, and so on.

 

            Weekly goals might include getting extra food to set aside when you go grocery shopping.  Rotate out storage food items and order replacements.  Go to the shooting range to practice.

 

            As for monthly goals, you might take a class on first aid, orienteering, ham radio, or another skill you may want to learn.  Set aside a weekend for a family activity, such as camping.  Review bugout bags and replace any items that may need it, or add new supplies.  Build your kits and bugoutbags over time and as you can afford it.

 

            You know your lifestyle and your resources better than I do, so do what you can to work your way toward an improved state of survival preparedness.  Anything you do is better than nothing.  Don’t get impatient, thinking you have to have everything done all at once.  If upheaval or calamity strikes tomorrow, you’ll be a bit further ahead because you did something today.

 

Author: John Wesley Smith

John Wesley Smith writes and podcasts from his home in Central Missouri. His goal is to help preppers as he continues along his own preparedness journey.